Winchester Mountain

Elevation (feet): 6,521
Elevation (meters): 1,988
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: Cascade Range
State: Washington
Latitude: 48.956524
Longitude: -121.643071
Difficulty: Walk up
Best months for climbing: Aug, Sep, Oct
Year first climbed: 1859
First successful climber(s): Henry Custer
Nearest major airport: Seattle-Tacoma
Convenient Center: Bellingham

Thanks to theyogiclimber for adding this peak.

Winchester Mountain is considered one of the premier dayhikes in the North Cascades because of its minimal effort to reach outstanding views. At a modest 6521 feet, Winchester Mountain has a fire lookout at the summit built in 1935 which has a commanding view into North Cascades National Park and the Mt. Baker Wilderness. Winchester Mountain is located 16 miles northeast of Mount Baker between Gold Run Pass to the west, Low Pass to its north, and Skagway Pass to the east. Meltwater from Winchester Mountain drains into the Swamp Creek to the south, Winchester Creek to the northeast, and Tomyhoi Creek to the northwest. Winchester Mountain was named by noted gold-miner Jack Post for his rifle in the late 1800's. Post discovered gold in 1897 at Twin Lakes below Winchester Mountain which started a gold rush in the area.

From Bellingham, drive the Mt. Baker Highway (Hwy 542) to the maintenance shed about 13 miles past the town of Glacier and turn left onto Twin Lakes Road. Drive the road as far as feasible, which may be the Tomyhoi Lake Trailhead for low clearance vehicles. Hike the rough road about 2.5 miles gaining about 1600 feet to Twin Lakes and locate the Winchester Mountain Trail between the two lakes. The trail gains 1400 feet in two miles from the lakes to the summit. The trail is usually blocked by a steep snow patch until August, so if you go early in the season take an ice axe & crampons, and avoid the crowds. The summit has wonderful views of Goat Mountain, Shuksan, Baker, Tomyhoi, Larrabee, American and Canadian Border Peaks, and many more. There is a fire lookout maintained by the Mount Baker Club from Bellingham which can be used on a space available basis.

Thanks to theyogiclimber for this description.