Hannegan Peak

Elevation (feet): 6,187
Elevation (meters): 1,886
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: Cascade Range
State: Washington
Latitude: 48.892148
Longitude: -121.534367
Difficulty: Walk up
Best months for climbing: Jul, Aug, Sep
Year first climbed: 1893
First successful climber(s): Banning Austin, R.M Lyle
Nearest major airport: Seattle-Tacoma
Convenient Center: Bellingham

Thanks to theyogiclimber for adding this peak.

Hannegan Peak is located within the Mt. Baker Wilderness, approximately a half mile west of the North Cascades National Park boundary. Hannegan Peak is part of a Cascade sub-range called the Skagit Range. The water that drains off the southeast slope of Hannegan Peak forms the headwater of the Chilliwack River. Snow melting from the northeast slope drains into Silesia Creek, and water draining off the west side of the peak flows into Ruth Creek. In 1893, Banning Austin scouted a route up Ruth Creek over Hannegan Pass to Whatcom Pass surveying for a road across the Cascades. Austin and R.M. Lyle climbed Hannegan Peak that year and named it for Tom Hannegan the State Road Commissioner at the time.

From the Mount Baker Highway, turn left on Forest Service Road 32, Hannegan Pass Road. Follow this one-lane dirt road for 5 miles to road’s end and a campground area at the trailhead. The Hannegan Pass Trail starts by paralleling 4 miles up Ruth Creek to Hannegan Pass gaining about 2000 feet in the process. Here a path leaves the pass and gains 1200 vertical feet in a mile along the south ridge to the gently rounded volcanic rhyolite summit. Views from the summit include Ruth, Blum, Shuksan, Baker, Challenger, Sefrit, Nooksack Ridge, Canadian peaks, and the Hannegan Caldera which erupted about 4 million years ago during the Pliocene epoch and is a precursor to the volcanism of Mt. Baker. Geologic remnants of the caldera are evident on the rapidly eroding southeast face of Hannegan Peak. A bivy site is available on the top of Hannegan Peak when available snow can be melted for drinking, but bears are known to frequent this area. In spring before the trail is snow-free, take an ice axe and crampons and beware of dangerous snow bridges over the creeks. By midsummer, the mountain is covered with wildflowers and the valley is thick with mosquitoes. In winter Hannegan is a wonderful destination for snowshoeing, but be aware of avalanche conditions.

Thanks to theyogiclimber for this description.