Mount Sneffels

Elevation (feet): 14,150
Elevation (meters): 4,313
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: San Juan Mountains
State: Colorado
Latitude: 38.0033
Longitude: -107.792
Difficulty: Scramble
Best months for climbing: May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct
Nearest major airport: Telluride, CO
Convenient Center: Ouray, CO

Thanks to Ken Whitteburg for adding this peak.

The Monarch of the San Juans. A steep and beautiful mountain; best climbed with spring consolidated snow to avoid horrible scree. One of the most majestic in Colorado. It typifies the San Juans in that it is surrounded by other enormous peaks (not fourteeners, however, in the immediate vicinity), and has a unique profile. Around the 'back-side,' there is a fairly large basin, while to the north, a broad plateau opens up to provide a terrific view at the summit on a clear day. The most popular route follows an obvious trail into the basin, followed by a scramble up the side in scree and talus to the ridge to the right of the summit. An interesting alternative, if one is up to it, is to follow a narrower, steeper trail to the saddle to the left, and do some class 3 climbing to the peak from the other side. Unfortunately, there is a jeep trail that goes all the way up to the basin, providing for crowded summer hikes. The beauty of the mountain is still there though, regardless.

Additional text submitted by Dirk Summers

Mount Sneffels is the monarch of surrounding peaks, and one of the most majestic in Colorado. It typifies the San Juans in that it is surrounded by other enormous peaks (not fourteeners, however, in the immediate vicinity), and has a unique profile. Around the 'back-side,' there is a fairly large basin, while to the north, a broad plateau opens up to provide a terrific view at the summit on a clear day. The most popular route follows an obvious trail into the basin, followed by a scramble up the side in scree and talus to the ridge to the right of the summit. An interesting alternative, if one is up to it, is to follow a narrower, steeper trail to the saddle to the left, and do some class 3 climbing to the peak from the other side. Unfortunately, there is a jeep trail that goes all the way up to the basin, providing for crowded summer hikes. The beauty of the mountain is still there though, regardless.

Thanks to Ken Whitteburg for this description.