Mount Delphine

Elevation (feet): 11,175
Elevation (meters): 3,406
Continent: North America
Country: Canada
Range/Region: Southwest Basins and Ranges
Province: British Columbia
Latitude: 50.465
Longitude: -116.453
Difficulty: Technical Climb
Best months for climbing: Jan, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Dec
Year first climbed: 1914
First successful climber(s): A. A. McCoubrey, E. Feuz Jr.
Nearest major airport: Cranbrook Airport
Convenient Center: Cranbrook, Golden

Thanks to Kevin Altheim for adding this peak.

Mount Delphine sits northwest of the head of Delphine Creek and south of the head of McDonald Creek. Both sides of the mountain are spectacular with the north aspect above McDonald Creek covered with several glaciers. The southeast aspect is equally impressive with the Delphine Glacier sitting in a huge basin below the southeast face and forming an icefall above the cliffs at the head of Delphine Creek. There is also a glacier with several hanging tongues on the face.

The north aspect can be accessed from the McDonald Creek drainage off of the Horsethief Creek Forest Service Road west of Radium. The southeast aspect and the Delphine Glacier can be accessed from the Toby Creek Forest Service Road west of Invermere and then Delphine Glacier Trail.

The mountain has several routes including the Northwest Ridge / Slopes (1914) A. A. McCoubrey, E. Feuz Jr, the South Ridge (1915 Aug) H. O. Frind, A. H. & E. L. MacCarthy, W. E. Stone, and Conrad Kain, and the East Ridge (1944 Sept) D. P & I. A Richards.

Named in 1911 by Edward Warren Harnden after George Starke's wife, who was born as Delphine Francour. Before that Starke prospected and was the original owner of a mine on the lower slopes of the mountain called Delphine, and Harnden applied the name from the mine. Control of the mine was later transferred to Rufus Kimpton who was known as the "Grubstaker of Golden". Starke later sold the mine and built the Delphine Hotel in Wilmer which to this day is in tact and serves as a bed and breakfast called the Delphine Lodge. Delphine Francour died in 1921.

The Delphine Glacier has also been used in the past by the National Cross Country Ski Team for practice and the glacier was site to some of the filming of the movie Alive. In fact, at the end of Alive they show a view from plane where you see Mount Delphine and the glacier, as well as the Iron Cross that is on top of Mount Nelson.

Thanks to Kevin Altheim for this description.

Trip Reports

NOTE: Trip reports were previously called "Summit Logs" - same feature, new name

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