Lincoln Peak

Elevation (feet): 9,080
Elevation (meters): 2,768
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: Cascade Range
State: Washington
Latitude: 48.768325
Longitude: -121.858635
Difficulty: Technical Climb
Best months for climbing: Jul, Aug, Sep
Year first climbed: 1956
First successful climber(s): Fred Beckey, Rupley, Grande, Staley
Nearest major airport: Seattle-Tacoma
Convenient Center: Bellingham

Thanks to Ronald James for adding this peak.

Lincoln Peak is the second highest of the Black Buttes and is also called the West Butte. (Colfax Peak is the highest and known as the East Butte.) Lincoln Peak is located two miles west of Mount Baker and less than a mile from Colfax Peak. Lincoln is a craggy remnant of an andesitic volcanic cone and the black coloring of Lincoln Peak is due to the gray-to-black fine-grained volcanic andesitic rock. The characteristic viscous andesitic lava allowed steep slopes to form, and with the cutting action of the Thunder Glacier on the north and Deming Glacier on the south, sheer walls were carved on Lincoln Peak. Rockfall hazard makes Lincoln an unappealing climbing objective. The peak is named for US President Abraham Lincoln.

Access: From the city of Bellingham, WA, drive east on the Mount Baker Highway (542) 32 miles to Glacier Creek Road (approximately one mile east of the town of Glacier) and turn right. Drive eight miles to the Heliotrope Ridge trailhead.

Refer to Fred Beckey's Cascade Alpine Guide, Volume 3, for information on the established climbing route.

Thanks to Ronald James for this description.