Dege Peak

Elevation (feet): 7,006
Elevation (meters): 2,135
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: Cascade Range
State: Washington
Latitude: 46.918497
Longitude: -121.610713
Difficulty: Walk up
Best months for climbing: May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct
Nearest major airport: Seattle-Tacoma
Convenient Center: Enumclaw

Thanks to Ronald James for adding this peak.

Dege Peak is located in the northeast quadrant of Mount Rainier National Park in a sub-range called the Sourdough Mountains. It is situated at the east end of the Sourdough Ridge where it floats above Yakima Park. The south face is covered by meadows and small trees and an easy trail leads to the summit. The north face is steeper and rockier. Trail approaches can be made from the east or the west. From the west, a 4.2 mile round-trip from the parking lot at Sunrise via the easy Sourdough Ridge Trail gains approximately 800 feet of elevation. From the east, a three mile round-trip trail gains about 900 feet elevation from the parking area at Sunrise Point. The hike can be done in about 2-3 hours depending on the amount of time you want to enjoy the view from the top. Dege Peak is a popular day-hike destination on sunny summer weekends so expect company at the top. The view from the summit has a beautiful commanding view of Mount Rainier and its Emmons and Winthrop Glaciers. In addition, on a clear day one can see as far away as Glacier Peak, Bears Breast Mountain, Mount Daniel, Mount Stuart, Mount Aix, Goat Rocks, and Mount Adams. Seasonally, the slopes of Dege Peak are covered with wildflowers such as lupine, Indian paintbrush, phlox, aster, and more. Dege is pronounced such that it rhymes with "reggae". ('deg-ay)

Refer to the guidebook Best Easy Day Hikes Mount Rainier National Park by Heidi Schneider and Mary Skjelset for more information.

The peak was named for James Dege, a prominent Tacoman. Mr. Dege was born in Philadelphia, July 27, 1868. After schooling in Atlanta he entered the merchandising business and came to Tacoma in 1889. He eventually owned one of the largest clothing stores in the city.

Thanks to Ronald James for this description.