Bishops Cap

Elevation (feet): 9,127
Elevation (meters): 2,782
Continent: North America
Country: United States
Range/Region: Central Montana Rockies
State: Montana
Latitude: 48.724604
Longitude: -113.709784
Difficulty: Technical Climb
Best months for climbing: Jul, Aug, Sep
Nearest major airport: Great Falls, MT
Convenient Center: West Glacier, MT

Thanks to Ronald James for adding this peak.

Bishops Cap is located in the Lewis Range in Glacier National Park. It is situated on the spine of the Continental Divide approximately two miles north of Logan Pass. Bishops Cap is a high point on The Garden Wall, which is a prominent glacial arĂȘte separating the Lake McDonald Valley from the Many Glacier Valley. An arĂȘte (French for fish-bone) is created when two glaciers carve the rock on opposite sides of the same wall sculpting a long, sharp, narrow ridge. Mount Gould to the north of Bishops Cap, and Pollock Mountain to the south are the two other significant summits on The Garden Wall. The scenic Going-to-the-Sun Road snakes below the western slope of Bishops Cap. The west face rises abruptly nearly five thousand feet from Logan Creek giving it significant local relief. From the Highline Trail slope, Bishops Cap is a class 4 scramble, which due to its close proximity to the Going-to-the Sun Road enables a one day ascent of approximately 2500 feet of elevation gain from the Highline Trail at Logan Pass. Check at the park visitor center at Logan Pass for climbing information and trail conditions.

The sedimentary rock of Bishops Cap was shaped by 1.6 billion years of geologic processes from sediment deposition, uplift, thrust faulting, and erosion by glaciers. The major geologic event that sculpted the landscape of Bishops Cap and the other peaks in Glacier National Park began approximately 2 million years ago when large ice sheets of the Pleistocene Ice Age repeatedly advanced and retreated until about 12,000 years ago.

The peak is named for its summit formation which resembles a bishop's cap when viewed from Logan Pass.

Thanks to Ronald James for this description.